First Coast News: LEE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FINALIST IN HARVARD CONTEST, NEED YOUR HELP TO WIN

 Eleventh grade students, Christopher Burgess and Billy Luper are spearheading the campaign. They are calling it "Your Story is Mine." The teen created a bulletin board that, every month, highlights different challenges students face.

Eleventh grade students, Christopher Burgess and Billy Luper are spearheading the campaign. They are calling it "Your Story is Mine." The teen created a bulletin board that, every month, highlights different challenges students face.

News4Jax: EVAC Meets President Obama!

On November 3, 2016, The EVAC had the absolute HONOR of a private meet and greet with President Obama in celebration of EVAC's juvenile justice advocacy work. 

Earlier that same week, the phenomenal White House staffer we worked with during our Sept. DC visit warned us there was "less than a 1% chance" of their being able to set this up. Special thanks to Jessica at the Juvenile Law Center for, yet again, going above and beyond in helping us achieve our dreams. "Against all odds" seems to be the running theme with this group in so, so many ways. 

 

The Florida Times-Union: JACKSONVILLE TEENAGER TO PARTICIPATE IN CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING ON JUVENILE JUSTICE REFORM

The briefing, to be held in the Russell Senate Office Building, comes on the heels of a new report from the Juvenile Law Center, which focuses on the high cost of fines and fees in the juvenile justice system.

The New York Times: COURT COSTS ENTRAP NONWHITE, POOR JUVENILE OFFENDERS

Dequan’s experience is hardly an isolated one. The ways that fines and fees can entrap low-income people in the adult courts have received enormous attention in the past year or two. But the systematic imposition of costs on juvenile offenders, with equally pernicious effects on the poorest of them, is far less known.

 Dequan Jackson, 16, at his home in Jacksonville, Fla. After Dequan was charged with battery at age 13, he and his mother were unable to pay $200 in court and public defender fees, which extended his probation by more than a year. CreditCharlotte Kesl for The New York Times

Dequan Jackson, 16, at his home in Jacksonville, Fla. After Dequan was charged with battery at age 13, he and his mother were unable to pay $200 in court and public defender fees, which extended his probation by more than a year. CreditCharlotte Kesl for The New York Times